News

Why does a normal looking human turn into a Jack the Ripper? According to dictionary a psychopath is a person with a horrible mental disorder that leads to violent, often murderous behaviour. But thus far it has been near impossible to understand what happens in the brain that turns a human into a raging psychopathic murderer? However, new research led by a Harvard professor of psychology Joshua Buckholtz into the wiring (neural circuits) that drives…
Wednesday, 12 July 2017 17:45

The gentler symptoms of dying

<p>Thanks to the interdependence of our organs, dyeing is rarely as painful as it looks. Morbid as it is, this masterpiece on how life passes into death published in the New York Times is a must-read to understand the drama of the ultimate, inescapable reality of life. “The human body’s most compassionate gift is the interdependence of its parts. As organs in the torso fail, the brain likewise shuts down,” says the author in a…
Wednesday, 12 July 2017 11:04

How brains make preference-based decisions?

Why do you choose blue over white or reach for a sweet instead of savoury? Innumerable times through our lives, our brain makes preference-based decisions that governs the choices we make. Now researchers are close to finding out how. A study published in a recent edition of Nature Communications by a team of neuroscientists at the University of Glasgow's Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology, offers an insight into the neural mechanisms that undergird the decision-making…
Know why you feel ‘high’ after exercise? It’s because work-outs prompt your brain to release naturally producing opioids! Even a single exercise session can have a positive effect on human mood and cognition, according to new research published in the journal Brain Plasticity. The study was led by Wendy A. Suzuki, Ph.D., a professor of neural science and psychology in the Center for Neural Science at New York University (NYU) in New York City. It…
Saturday, 08 July 2017 11:09

Doodle your depression away

A new study at the Drexel University in Philadelphia, USA says that artistic pursuit, doodling in particular, gladdens the brain. “When you doodle the reward pathway in your brain get super active,” says Girija Kaimal who led the investigation. “This leads to a feeling of pleasure.” And you do not have to be a Rembrandt to experience such art-induced delight. “The level of your artistic skill is not particularly important,” says the study, “so long…
It may be possible to ward off Alzheimer's disease, a chronic and thus far incurable and irreversible neurodegenerative disease, simply by adding extra-virgin olive oil to your daily diet according to a study. Published in prestigious journal Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology the study conducted by the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University (LKSOM) in Philadelphia, says that extra-virgin olive oil -- a key ingredient of Mediterranean food –appears to defend the…
Friday, 09 June 2017 10:58

You can get more creative on demand

Want to get more creative? Just shut down parts of your brain. It’s all down to understanding the mechanics of creativity, say researchers at the London-based Queen Mary University and Goldsmiths University who led the study. For years neuroscientists, philosophers, corporate leaders and artists have grappled with a core question related to creativity: what can we do to become more creative? Finally, it appears, we are close to an answer. In their quest to find…
An enzyme that apparently helps brain tumours grow has been uncovered by researchers at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Centre in Houston. The finding opens the possibility for new approaches to fighting the lethal disease that has thus far proved unstoppable. The study demonstrates the ability of brain tumours to feed and thrive even when deprived of nutrients and oxygen. This happens because of an enzyme known as acetyl-CoA synthetase 2 (ACSS2), which…
Medulloblastoma, the most common type of malignant cancers among children, is in fact a melange of seven separate conditions each calling for a different treatment according to a study by a group of scientists at the Newcastle and Northumbria universities. The disease currently causes around 10 per cent of all childhood cancer deaths The study published in the prestigious journal The Lancet Oncology says that seven distinct sub- groups each distinguished by its own distinct…
Friday, 26 May 2017 12:04

We can ‘smell’ as well as dogs

A neuroscientist has stated that human olfactory abilities are second to none. When it comes to certain smells in particular our smelling prowess can match even that of dogs, which have higher concentration of olfactory receptors in their noses. In the case of some scents, such as amyl acetate, the main odorant in bananas, humans in fact outdo dogs says a study led by John McGann, a neuroscientist at Rutgers University in New Jersey and…
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